Grain Mill Comparison NutriMill vs. WonderMill

 

VS.

Grain  Mill Comparison:

I love to make my own bread and using fresh ground wheat.  My first experience with making bread was when I was twelve years old and my mom gave me the assignment of making our family’s bread.  I have to admit that I hated it at first.  My mom had this old wheat grinder that would spray flour dust into the air and it was so loud!  I had to take it outside and grind the wheat.  Then I had to mix the bread by hand, which I didn’t love either.  My mom eventually bought a Bosch mixer and that was amazing!  

When I was older and started my own family I decided that I wanted to continue to make our own bread.  For my birthday my husband bought me Bosch mixer and I also received a Wondermill grain mill.  I make bread every 1-2 weeks and would freeze the loafs in the freezer to last.    My Bosch mixer handles that amount of dough with no problems and it is SO much better than mixing by hand.  Ha ha.  No surprise there.   I really loved my Wondermill as well and it lasted about 8 years.   I have since bought the Nutrimill and I have enjoyed that as well.  

Now that I have tried and tested both grain mills here’s a list of pros and cons to each:

 

WonderMill Grain Mill Pros:

It’s quiet and mess free.

It’s compacity of wheat to grind is about 8 cups, and the flour bowl capacity is 16 cups. 

I love the detachable flour bowl that comes with a lid for storage.

It’s fast.

Cons:

The machine HAS to be on before you fill it with grain.  I accidentally poured the grain into the hopper before the machine was on and broke it.  My husband took it apart and fixed it, but I didn’t love that it was so easy to break.  

 

NutriMill Classic Pros:

Large capacity at 20 cups of flour and the hopper and flour bowl match so you only have to fill it once. 

You can fill the bowl before turning it on or after.  You won’t break the machine.  Even if you stop during grinding.  

It’s quiet and mess free.

Cons:

It’s not as fast as the Wondermill.

The lid on the flour container is somewhat difficult to put on.  Although I have found adding cornstarch to the rubber rim helps tremendously.  

 

All in all my favorite has been the Nutrimill.  I love that I can’t break it by accidentally pouring in the wheat before it is turned on.  And I love the extra flour capacity of the Nutrimill. 

Here’s my whole wheat bread recipe.

 

Here’s my soaked whole wheat bread recipe.

 

Canned Chicken

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I am ALL about convenience, so when I am reading a recipe that calls for cooked chicken breast and I don’t already HAVE cooked chicken breast, then it is not happening.    So when my mom gave me a jar of her canned chicken and it actually tasted good I was SOLD!    

I was even more amazed at how easy and simple it is to can your own chicken.  This is now my 4th year of canning chicken and it is a staple in my pantry.    I use it for chicken enchiladas, soups, chicken salads, pizza, calzones, etc.  Anything that calls for cooked chicken!  It’s SO awesome!  

Let’s get started on how easy this process is:
 
I usually purchase my chicken breasts from the local grocery store in bulk.  I get a better deal that way.   

You want to take the chicken breast and trim off any fat.  That way your don’t have any chewy, squeaky parts.  Then you stuff those babies as tight as you can into the jar size of your choice, leaving 1-inch headspace at the top.   I usually use pint size jars, as that would be about two cups of chicken, which I have  found most recipes call for.  

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Once the chicken is in the jars, add 1/2 tsp of canning or pickling salt to each jar.  Following the salt, wipe the rims of the jars clean.  If the rims are not clean then the jar will not seal properly and you will have spoiled chicken.  

While you’re wiping those jars clean, you want to have your canning lids in boiling water for a few minutes so the rubber is nice and soft and ready to seal. 

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You want to use a pressure cooker to process your jars.  My jars processed for 75 minutes at 13 lbs pressure.  Your pressure will be different according to the altitude in your area.  You can call your local extension office to find out the safest way to process your meat for your altitude. 

After  the 75 minutes, you wait for your pressure gauge to go back down to zero before taking the lid off.  Pressure cookers can be dangerous if used improperly.   Taking the lid off before it reaches zero could cause the pressure cooker to explode.  

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Take your jars out carefully and allow them to cool on the counter.  You will hear the lids begin to seal.  After 12-24 hours  you can check to see that your lids have sealed.  Do not check your lids until after at least 12 hours, as you can cause a false seal by pressing down on the lids before they have had time to seal themselves.  

Good luck and enjoy your ready to eat chicken!

Canned Chicken

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 35 minutes

Canned Chicken

Ingredients

  • Raw chicken
  • Canning or pickling salt
  • Canning jars (either pints or quarts)
  • Canning lids
  • Pressure cooker

Instructions

  1. Cut any fat off of the meat and put raw meat into canning jars, leaving 1 inch of head space. Add 1/2 tsp salt to pint jars and 1 tsp to quart jars. Put lids in pan of water to boil until rubber rim is soft. Wipe jar rims and put hot lids on.
  2. Put jars in pressure canner and add 2 1/2 quarts hot water to canner. Put lid on and turn on high. When it starts to steam, time for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes put regulator on and start time when it reaches 13 lbs pressure. (Here's a handy altitude chart to find out what your pressure should be.) Keep pressure at the correct pressure for 75 minutes. You may need to adjust heat accordingly. Watch carefully and never leave a pressure cooker unattended. Let drop to 0 before opening.
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